Tures of rat, porcine and human PT cells exhibit a large

Tures of rat, porcine and human PT cells exhibit a large spectrum of proteins involved in xenobiotic cellular processing. These cells express numerous biotransformation enzymes and drug transporters such as cytochromes P450, glutathione (GSH)-dependent enzymes, the ABC multidrug transporters and organic anion and cation transporters [4,21?4]. In addition, primary cultures of human PT cells fromPrimary Human Proximal Renal Culture ModelFigure 8. Evaluation of PT cells and CD10/CD13 double-negative cells phenotypic stability. (A) Fluorescence plot showing PT cells labeled with antibodies against CD10 (APC: allophycocyanin) and CD13 (PE: phycoerythrin) after four passages. Flow cytometry revealed about 94 SC 1 double-positive cells. (B) buy ZK-36374 Relative percentage of CD10/CD13 double-positive cells at passages 2, 3, 4 and 5 in the PT cells populations (n = 4). NS: nonsignificant (p.0.05). (C) Representative western blots for PT cells over 5 passages. Blots were incubated with antibodies against aquaporin-1, Ncadherin, MUC1. The b-actin protein was used as an internal control (D) Fluorescence plot showing the CD10/CD13 double-negative cell population labeled with antibodies against CD10 and CD13 after two passages. Flow cytometry revealed about 15 double-negative cells. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0066750.gmultiple donors allow the in vitro 16985061 study inter-individual variations in cellular metabolic capacity. Primary human PT cell cultures are commercially available and have been used in several toxicological studies [5,25,26]. However, in spite of the interest of these models, they present several disadvantages, such as a unique donor for each lot. Moreover, when tested by flow cytometry, commercial PT cells displayed lower expression levels of both CD10 and CD13 in our hands (Figure S2), suggesting a heterogeneous renal epithelial population. In fact, the study of responses that are consistent across individuals could be hampered by the use of these commercial models. Although several studies have previously described protocols for establishing PT cell primary cultures, these are hampered by frequent heterocellular contamination, cellular differentiation/ dedifferentiation and poor viability [10]. The aim of our work was to establish and characterize a model of primary PT cells that would ensure their phenotypic purity and the stability, as well as verify its limitations. In our study, we used a FACS protocol for the isolation of a highly differentiated population of PT cells. Since previous studies have shown that surface markers can be used for flow cytometric selection [20], we used two specific proximal tubular epithelial cell surface markers CD10 and CD13 [2,8]. Wedemonstrate that populations that express either CD10 and CD13 alone are in fact mixed populations expressing both proximal and distal tubule markers, although several studies have based their models of primary human PT cell cultures on cell sorting for CD13 alone [2,27]. By contrast, CD10/CD13 double-positive cells express only proximal markers (aquaporin-1 and N-cadherin) while double-negative cells express only distal and collecting duct markers (MUC1 and E-cadherin). Moreover, we confirm the previous demonstration by Sens et al (1999) [28] that renal cells exhibit an epithelial phenotype when cultured in FBS-free medium supplemented with EGF. Our results thus support the view that only CD10/CD13 double-positive sorted cells cultured in serumfree medium with EGF represent a pure populatio.Tures of rat, porcine and human PT cells exhibit a large spectrum of proteins involved in xenobiotic cellular processing. These cells express numerous biotransformation enzymes and drug transporters such as cytochromes P450, glutathione (GSH)-dependent enzymes, the ABC multidrug transporters and organic anion and cation transporters [4,21?4]. In addition, primary cultures of human PT cells fromPrimary Human Proximal Renal Culture ModelFigure 8. Evaluation of PT cells and CD10/CD13 double-negative cells phenotypic stability. (A) Fluorescence plot showing PT cells labeled with antibodies against CD10 (APC: allophycocyanin) and CD13 (PE: phycoerythrin) after four passages. Flow cytometry revealed about 94 double-positive cells. (B) Relative percentage of CD10/CD13 double-positive cells at passages 2, 3, 4 and 5 in the PT cells populations (n = 4). NS: nonsignificant (p.0.05). (C) Representative western blots for PT cells over 5 passages. Blots were incubated with antibodies against aquaporin-1, Ncadherin, MUC1. The b-actin protein was used as an internal control (D) Fluorescence plot showing the CD10/CD13 double-negative cell population labeled with antibodies against CD10 and CD13 after two passages. Flow cytometry revealed about 15 double-negative cells. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0066750.gmultiple donors allow the in vitro 16985061 study inter-individual variations in cellular metabolic capacity. Primary human PT cell cultures are commercially available and have been used in several toxicological studies [5,25,26]. However, in spite of the interest of these models, they present several disadvantages, such as a unique donor for each lot. Moreover, when tested by flow cytometry, commercial PT cells displayed lower expression levels of both CD10 and CD13 in our hands (Figure S2), suggesting a heterogeneous renal epithelial population. In fact, the study of responses that are consistent across individuals could be hampered by the use of these commercial models. Although several studies have previously described protocols for establishing PT cell primary cultures, these are hampered by frequent heterocellular contamination, cellular differentiation/ dedifferentiation and poor viability [10]. The aim of our work was to establish and characterize a model of primary PT cells that would ensure their phenotypic purity and the stability, as well as verify its limitations. In our study, we used a FACS protocol for the isolation of a highly differentiated population of PT cells. Since previous studies have shown that surface markers can be used for flow cytometric selection [20], we used two specific proximal tubular epithelial cell surface markers CD10 and CD13 [2,8]. Wedemonstrate that populations that express either CD10 and CD13 alone are in fact mixed populations expressing both proximal and distal tubule markers, although several studies have based their models of primary human PT cell cultures on cell sorting for CD13 alone [2,27]. By contrast, CD10/CD13 double-positive cells express only proximal markers (aquaporin-1 and N-cadherin) while double-negative cells express only distal and collecting duct markers (MUC1 and E-cadherin). Moreover, we confirm the previous demonstration by Sens et al (1999) [28] that renal cells exhibit an epithelial phenotype when cultured in FBS-free medium supplemented with EGF. Our results thus support the view that only CD10/CD13 double-positive sorted cells cultured in serumfree medium with EGF represent a pure populatio.

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