Ctancy of 50, the absolute difference between the two is 20 which represents

Ctancy of 50, the absolute difference between the two is 20 which represents low similarity when compared to the United AnlotinibMedChemExpress Anlotinib Kingdom’s life expectancy of 72 for this indicator. In Fig 9, we can observe the variations in similarity for countries with different levels of community multiplexity. What is immediately striking is that countries that share a maximal number of communities and therefore exhibit the greatest community multiplexity, have the smallest margin of difference across all indicators. This suggests that countries with the highest community multiplexity have a very similar socioeconomic profile. This is confirmed by a two-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test between the distributions of AZD-8055MedChemExpress AZD-8055 differences in each indicator for pairs sharing different numbers of communities. Although the KS statistic is lower between groups sharing 0 and 1 communities (apx. 0.1 for all indicators and p-value <0.01), it is very high for groups between 1 and 6 communities (0.4 and above, p-value <0.01), except for mobile phone penetration (detailed KS test results are presented in S1 Table).PLOS ONE | DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0155976 June 1,15 /The International Postal Network and Other Global Flows as Proxies for National WellbeingFig 9. Socioeconomic difference margin between countries who share communities in the global flow networks. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0155976.gFurther to this observation, in most indicators there is a very strong significance in the level of community multiplexity–the higher the community multiplexity index between two countries, the smaller the difference between their socioeconomic profiles. There are notable exceptions to this such as the mobile phone penetration ratio, where it appears that beyond the highest level of multiplexity, all other countries are relatively similar in this aspect with low variation even for those pairs of countries which share no communities. For all other indicators such as GDP, Literacy ratio, HDI and Internet penetration, there is a dramatic increase in similarity past a community multiplexity of 3. Ultimately, these similarities can be used to estimate the wellbeing of countries for which it is unknown but can be estimated from its neighbours.DiscussionBig data is often related to real-time data captured through the Internet or social networks. However, the digital divide makes access to big data insights for development more challenging in the least developed and many developing and emerging countries. Can we rely on other networks to overcome these critical data gaps in view of better measuring and monitoring developmental progress? This is particularly important following the United Nations adoption of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) in September 2015, made of 17 goals, 169 targets and almost 200 universal indicators, each of them calling for regular and increasingly disaggregated monitoring in every country during the 2016?0 period. This commitment invites a nuanced discussion on the nature and importance of measurement, inference and triangulation of data sources. This discussion is particularly prescient in the face of complex intertwined developmental challenges in an age of increased globalisation, economic interdependence and climate change. The work presented above has clearly shown the value of measuring, comparing, and combining metrics of global connectivity across six different global networks in order to approximate socioeconomic indicators and to identify network communities.Ctancy of 50, the absolute difference between the two is 20 which represents low similarity when compared to the United Kingdom’s life expectancy of 72 for this indicator. In Fig 9, we can observe the variations in similarity for countries with different levels of community multiplexity. What is immediately striking is that countries that share a maximal number of communities and therefore exhibit the greatest community multiplexity, have the smallest margin of difference across all indicators. This suggests that countries with the highest community multiplexity have a very similar socioeconomic profile. This is confirmed by a two-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test between the distributions of differences in each indicator for pairs sharing different numbers of communities. Although the KS statistic is lower between groups sharing 0 and 1 communities (apx. 0.1 for all indicators and p-value <0.01), it is very high for groups between 1 and 6 communities (0.4 and above, p-value <0.01), except for mobile phone penetration (detailed KS test results are presented in S1 Table).PLOS ONE | DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0155976 June 1,15 /The International Postal Network and Other Global Flows as Proxies for National WellbeingFig 9. Socioeconomic difference margin between countries who share communities in the global flow networks. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0155976.gFurther to this observation, in most indicators there is a very strong significance in the level of community multiplexity–the higher the community multiplexity index between two countries, the smaller the difference between their socioeconomic profiles. There are notable exceptions to this such as the mobile phone penetration ratio, where it appears that beyond the highest level of multiplexity, all other countries are relatively similar in this aspect with low variation even for those pairs of countries which share no communities. For all other indicators such as GDP, Literacy ratio, HDI and Internet penetration, there is a dramatic increase in similarity past a community multiplexity of 3. Ultimately, these similarities can be used to estimate the wellbeing of countries for which it is unknown but can be estimated from its neighbours.DiscussionBig data is often related to real-time data captured through the Internet or social networks. However, the digital divide makes access to big data insights for development more challenging in the least developed and many developing and emerging countries. Can we rely on other networks to overcome these critical data gaps in view of better measuring and monitoring developmental progress? This is particularly important following the United Nations adoption of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) in September 2015, made of 17 goals, 169 targets and almost 200 universal indicators, each of them calling for regular and increasingly disaggregated monitoring in every country during the 2016?0 period. This commitment invites a nuanced discussion on the nature and importance of measurement, inference and triangulation of data sources. This discussion is particularly prescient in the face of complex intertwined developmental challenges in an age of increased globalisation, economic interdependence and climate change. The work presented above has clearly shown the value of measuring, comparing, and combining metrics of global connectivity across six different global networks in order to approximate socioeconomic indicators and to identify network communities.

.pone.0119985.gAs expected, childhood maltreatment was associated with several covariates known

.pone.0119985.gAs expected, childhood maltreatment was associated with several EPZ-5676 web covariates known to be related to BMI (Table 3). Some covariates such as unemployment and smoking have been shown in the literature to be negatively associated with BMI, e.g. on average, smokers have a lower BMI [11]. In our study such characteristics were more common among maltreated groups: e.g., prevalence of smoking and unemployment 23y to 50y was higher in the maltreated than nonmaltreated (Table 3). Potentially, these differences would lower the adult BMI among those exposed to childhood maltreatment. Allowance for such factors and their changes over time, as well as other covariates, is important for understanding associations with BMI at specific ages and BMI trajectories. Modelled lifetime trajectories of zBMI and obesity risk (Table 4 and S2 Table) confirmed the patterns with age suggested by simple analyses.Childhood abuseIn both genders there was a positive linear association between zBMI gain with age and Quisinostat mechanism of action physical abuse, by 0.006/y (males) and 0.007/y (females) after adjustment for all covariatesPLOS ONE | DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0119985 March 26,7 /Child Maltreatment and BMI TrajectoriesTable 3. Characteristics of those with no childhood maltreatment and those abused or neglected ( ). Abuse Non-maltreated Males

Sub-human monstrosities that bear an uncanny likeness to Tonks’ portraits and

Sub-human monstrosities that bear an uncanny likeness to Tonks’ portraits and the case photographs of the same men housed in the Gillies Archives at Queen Mary’s Hospital in Sidcup. Tonks regarded his surgical studies as “rather dreadful Anisomycin site subjects for the public view” (n.p.) and complained of “all the more tedious visitors” to the hospital for whom the drawings were one of the “sights” (Hone, 128). In recent years, though, the portraits have found a wider audience. They have been exhibited at the Venice Biennale, Tate Britain, the Science Museum in London, the Hunterian Museum at the Royal College of Surgeons of England, the Wellcome Collection, University College London, and the National Army Museum in Chelsea. In June 2007 the full series was made digitally available on the website of the Gillies Archives,4 and Pat Barker has spoken of them as a source of inspiration for her new novel Toby’s Room.5 The photographs of Gillies’ patients have entered the public domain alongside the drawings. A selection of complete case files from the Gillies Archives can be viewed online as part of the Wellcome-funded Sci-Art collaboration, Project Fa de, and case photographs have featured in several recent exhibitions including Faces of 3′-Methylquercetin web Battle at the National Army Museum and War and Medicine at the Wellcome.6 Even more than the drawings, the photographs question the limits and propriety of spectatorship. At least with the pastels, one is aware — almost physically — of Tonks’ attentiveness, the qualityM E D I C A L A R C H I V E S A N D D I G I TA L C U L T U R EFIGURE 1 Photograph of Henry Tonks in his room at The Queen’s Hospital, Sidcup, 1917.P H OTO G R AP H I E SFIGURE 2 Horace Nicholls, Repairing War’s Ravages: Renovating facial injuries. Captain Derwent Wood painting the plate. Imperial War Museum, Q.30.457. ?IWM.M E D I C A L A R C H I V E S A N D D I G I TA L C U L T U R Eof the artist’s touch and the duration of his gaze. His authority, as an artist and surgeon, licenses our own interest. The photographs appear unmediated by any aesthetic concerns: physically and psychologically naked. When I teach this material (usually to history of art students), I tend not to use the most harrowing images of facial injury and reconstructive surgery. Apart from my own discomfort, I worry how my students will respond: with pity? With disgust? Fascination? Should I name the patient, or protect his anonymity? Would he, or his relatives, want the photograph to be shown in a non-medical context? Is there a happy ending — a redemptive “after surgery” to counterbalance the “before”? These questions might give me pause for thought, but they generally remain unspoken. Here, though, I have chosen one image precisely because it confronts the interested, curious or appalled viewer with the problematic nature of spectatorship and empathy. In an interview with Marq Smith, W.J.T. Mitchell speculated that “the most interesting new questions for visual studies . . . will be located at the frontiers of visuality, the places where seeing approaches a limit” (36). I would suggest that medical images are one such frontier: an ethical borderland in which legal definitions of privacy, personhood and human rights compete with the contemporary politics of witnessing, memory and memorialisation; a space of fantasy where fascination and aversion are found in equal measure. The photograph in question (Figure 3) is a pre-operative record of one of Gillies’ patients, who was also draw.Sub-human monstrosities that bear an uncanny likeness to Tonks’ portraits and the case photographs of the same men housed in the Gillies Archives at Queen Mary’s Hospital in Sidcup. Tonks regarded his surgical studies as “rather dreadful subjects for the public view” (n.p.) and complained of “all the more tedious visitors” to the hospital for whom the drawings were one of the “sights” (Hone, 128). In recent years, though, the portraits have found a wider audience. They have been exhibited at the Venice Biennale, Tate Britain, the Science Museum in London, the Hunterian Museum at the Royal College of Surgeons of England, the Wellcome Collection, University College London, and the National Army Museum in Chelsea. In June 2007 the full series was made digitally available on the website of the Gillies Archives,4 and Pat Barker has spoken of them as a source of inspiration for her new novel Toby’s Room.5 The photographs of Gillies’ patients have entered the public domain alongside the drawings. A selection of complete case files from the Gillies Archives can be viewed online as part of the Wellcome-funded Sci-Art collaboration, Project Fa de, and case photographs have featured in several recent exhibitions including Faces of Battle at the National Army Museum and War and Medicine at the Wellcome.6 Even more than the drawings, the photographs question the limits and propriety of spectatorship. At least with the pastels, one is aware — almost physically — of Tonks’ attentiveness, the qualityM E D I C A L A R C H I V E S A N D D I G I TA L C U L T U R EFIGURE 1 Photograph of Henry Tonks in his room at The Queen’s Hospital, Sidcup, 1917.P H OTO G R AP H I E SFIGURE 2 Horace Nicholls, Repairing War’s Ravages: Renovating facial injuries. Captain Derwent Wood painting the plate. Imperial War Museum, Q.30.457. ?IWM.M E D I C A L A R C H I V E S A N D D I G I TA L C U L T U R Eof the artist’s touch and the duration of his gaze. His authority, as an artist and surgeon, licenses our own interest. The photographs appear unmediated by any aesthetic concerns: physically and psychologically naked. When I teach this material (usually to history of art students), I tend not to use the most harrowing images of facial injury and reconstructive surgery. Apart from my own discomfort, I worry how my students will respond: with pity? With disgust? Fascination? Should I name the patient, or protect his anonymity? Would he, or his relatives, want the photograph to be shown in a non-medical context? Is there a happy ending — a redemptive “after surgery” to counterbalance the “before”? These questions might give me pause for thought, but they generally remain unspoken. Here, though, I have chosen one image precisely because it confronts the interested, curious or appalled viewer with the problematic nature of spectatorship and empathy. In an interview with Marq Smith, W.J.T. Mitchell speculated that “the most interesting new questions for visual studies . . . will be located at the frontiers of visuality, the places where seeing approaches a limit” (36). I would suggest that medical images are one such frontier: an ethical borderland in which legal definitions of privacy, personhood and human rights compete with the contemporary politics of witnessing, memory and memorialisation; a space of fantasy where fascination and aversion are found in equal measure. The photograph in question (Figure 3) is a pre-operative record of one of Gillies’ patients, who was also draw.

‘ coordinate is the percentage of roles (s)he accepted for each

‘ coordinate is the percentage of roles (s)he accepted for each category. Scatterplots are for (a) ordinary favorable roles, (b) extraordinary favorable roles, (c) ordinary unfavorable roles, and (d) extraordinary unfavorable roles. SPQ, schizotypal personality questionnaire.** ** * ** * ** **Reaction Times (ms)Percentage of accepted roles70 60 50 40 30 20 101180 1160 1140 1120 1100 1080 1060 1040 1020 1000 980 960 940 920**Ordinary FavorableOrdinary Extraordinary Unfavorable Favorable Category combinations High SPQ scorersExtraordinary UnfavorableOrdinary FavorableExtraordinary Ordinary Favorable Unfavorable Category combinations High extraordinary role acceptersExtraordinary UnfavorableLow SPQ scorersLow extraordinary role acceptersAcceptanceRejectionFigure 2. Percentages of social roles accepted in each category for high- and low-SPQ scorers and standard errors (vertical bars) for the 203 participants. *P o0.05, **P o0.0001. SPQ, schizotypal personality questionnaire.Figure 3. Mean reaction times and standard errors (vertical bars) for accepted (plain rectangles) and rejected (crosshatched rectangles) social roles for high and low extraordinary roles accepters. *Po 0.05.(i.e., bizarre behavior, thought disorders, unusual thoughts, poor insight, and difficulty in abstract thinking).16 In accordance with that view, the multiple regression suggested that the tendency to accept ordinary favorable roles had some protective effect againstnpj Schizophrenia (2016)schizotypal traits. Across all the categories, individuals with AKB-6548 supplier higher SPQ scores accepted more social roles than those with lower scores. All these results are reminiscent of the numerous anecdotes, so often published in the media, about thePublished in partnership with the Schizophrenia International Research SocietyExtraordinary roles and schizotypy AL Fernandez-Cruz et al5 disorganization of famous artists and the extraordinary roles they perform in society, now and in the past.17 On the other hand, works, such as the study of Twomey et al.,18 link psychoticism to openness to experience, sensation-seeking and creativity. Similarly, it was observed that, among writers and actors, scores for psychoticism were higher than among less `creative’ individuals19 and Andreasen noted in 1996 (ref. 20) that highly creative people had higher scores on measures of psychopathology than less creative people. In our case, this is akin to individuals who accept a lesser percentage of extraordinary social roles having lower SPQ scores. Further supporting the drive hypothesis, high accepters of extraordinary roles appeared `more enthusiast’ at accepting roles and more reluctant at rejecting them as they took less times for acceptances and more times for rejections than low accepters. This could be related to a higher baseline level of activation of the brain representations of these roles in the participants with higher SPQ scores. These results were obtained in a sample of the general population. Given the low frequency of schizotypy and of schizophrenia in that population, it is highly unlikely that those who accepted more extraordinary roles did it as a consequence of some LT-253MedChemExpress APTO-253 pre-existing schizophrenia factors. One could eliminate an effect of the cognitive deficits found in the continuum going from normality to schizophrenia via schizotypy.9?3,21 In the task, these deficits would have induced longer reaction times for those who accepted more extraordinary roles or for the subgroup with higher SPQ.’ coordinate is the percentage of roles (s)he accepted for each category. Scatterplots are for (a) ordinary favorable roles, (b) extraordinary favorable roles, (c) ordinary unfavorable roles, and (d) extraordinary unfavorable roles. SPQ, schizotypal personality questionnaire.** ** * ** * ** **Reaction Times (ms)Percentage of accepted roles70 60 50 40 30 20 101180 1160 1140 1120 1100 1080 1060 1040 1020 1000 980 960 940 920**Ordinary FavorableOrdinary Extraordinary Unfavorable Favorable Category combinations High SPQ scorersExtraordinary UnfavorableOrdinary FavorableExtraordinary Ordinary Favorable Unfavorable Category combinations High extraordinary role acceptersExtraordinary UnfavorableLow SPQ scorersLow extraordinary role acceptersAcceptanceRejectionFigure 2. Percentages of social roles accepted in each category for high- and low-SPQ scorers and standard errors (vertical bars) for the 203 participants. *P o0.05, **P o0.0001. SPQ, schizotypal personality questionnaire.Figure 3. Mean reaction times and standard errors (vertical bars) for accepted (plain rectangles) and rejected (crosshatched rectangles) social roles for high and low extraordinary roles accepters. *Po 0.05.(i.e., bizarre behavior, thought disorders, unusual thoughts, poor insight, and difficulty in abstract thinking).16 In accordance with that view, the multiple regression suggested that the tendency to accept ordinary favorable roles had some protective effect againstnpj Schizophrenia (2016)schizotypal traits. Across all the categories, individuals with higher SPQ scores accepted more social roles than those with lower scores. All these results are reminiscent of the numerous anecdotes, so often published in the media, about thePublished in partnership with the Schizophrenia International Research SocietyExtraordinary roles and schizotypy AL Fernandez-Cruz et al5 disorganization of famous artists and the extraordinary roles they perform in society, now and in the past.17 On the other hand, works, such as the study of Twomey et al.,18 link psychoticism to openness to experience, sensation-seeking and creativity. Similarly, it was observed that, among writers and actors, scores for psychoticism were higher than among less `creative’ individuals19 and Andreasen noted in 1996 (ref. 20) that highly creative people had higher scores on measures of psychopathology than less creative people. In our case, this is akin to individuals who accept a lesser percentage of extraordinary social roles having lower SPQ scores. Further supporting the drive hypothesis, high accepters of extraordinary roles appeared `more enthusiast’ at accepting roles and more reluctant at rejecting them as they took less times for acceptances and more times for rejections than low accepters. This could be related to a higher baseline level of activation of the brain representations of these roles in the participants with higher SPQ scores. These results were obtained in a sample of the general population. Given the low frequency of schizotypy and of schizophrenia in that population, it is highly unlikely that those who accepted more extraordinary roles did it as a consequence of some pre-existing schizophrenia factors. One could eliminate an effect of the cognitive deficits found in the continuum going from normality to schizophrenia via schizotypy.9?3,21 In the task, these deficits would have induced longer reaction times for those who accepted more extraordinary roles or for the subgroup with higher SPQ.

D ETS-1 blockade have beneficial additive effects on renal injury, suggesting

D ETS-1 blockade have beneficial additive effects on renal injury, suggesting that concomitant blockade of RAS and ETS-1 could be a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment and prevention of end-organ injury in hypertension.Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author ManuscriptAcknowledgmentsWe are grateful for the support of Core Facilities at the O’Brien Kidney Center at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Sources of Funding A Merit Review Award (E.A. Jaimes), a Research Grant (1 IP1 BX001595; P.W. Sanders and E.A. Jaimes) from the Office of Research and Development, Medical Research Service, Department of Veterans Affairs, a National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases George M. O’Brien Kidney and Urological Research Centers Program Grant P30-DK-079337, and a Byrne Fund Grant (E.A. Jaimes) from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center funded these studies.
Adolescence is the developmental period most strongly associated with the initiation and escalation of substance use (Colder et al., 2002). Adolescent alcohol use is of concern because it is often associated with a variety of negative consequences including increased alcohol use later in life (Hawkins et al., 1997), decreased academic performance (Balsa et al., 2011), and illicit drug use (Hill et al., 2000). Understanding the factors that influence adolescent drinking is important for developing empirically supported etiological models and effective interventions. During adolescence, an increasing amount of time is spent outside of the home and in the context of peers (Spear, 2000), and peers are believed to play a central role in the initiation and escalation of adolescent alcohol use (Barnes et al., 2007). Adolescents are often motivated to align their behaviors and opinions with those of their peers in part because they have a strong desire to maintain close peer relationships and to be accepted by their peers groups (Collins and Steinberg, 2006). Thus, perceived peer norms (e.g., perceptions of the behaviors peers engage in as well as perceptions of behaviors peers approve of) are viewed as an important mechanism through which peers influence a variety of behaviors, including alcohol use (Borsari and Carey, 2001; Cialdini and Goldstein, 2004). In this study, we propose that the influence of perceived norms on adolescent early alcohol use is not uniform and test whether the strength of the association between perceived norms and alcohol use depends on the type of social norm (descriptive or injunctive), an adolescent’s social goals, and grade. Social Norms According to the Focus Theory of Normative Conduct, individuals adjust their behavior to match that of a purchase 1,1-Dimethylbiguanide hydrochloride relevant referent group because norms dictate what behaviors are socially acceptable (Cialdini and Goldstein, 2004). In this regard, social norms have been conceptualized as informal rules and standards that groups adopt to guide and constrain behavior (Cialdini and Trost, 1998). The evidence suggests that two types of perceived social norms are particularly relevant for understanding adolescent drinking behaviors, descriptive norms (perceptions of peer drinking) and 4F-Benzoyl-TN14003MedChemExpress BKT140 injunctive norms (perceptions of the acceptability of peer drinking) (Borsari and Carey, 2001). Descriptive and injunctive norms have been associated with a variety of drinking behaviors in both cross-sectional and longitudinal studies (Collins and Spelman, 2013 Larimer et al., 2004; Read et al., 2002; Teunissen et al.D ETS-1 blockade have beneficial additive effects on renal injury, suggesting that concomitant blockade of RAS and ETS-1 could be a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment and prevention of end-organ injury in hypertension.Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author ManuscriptAcknowledgmentsWe are grateful for the support of Core Facilities at the O’Brien Kidney Center at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Sources of Funding A Merit Review Award (E.A. Jaimes), a Research Grant (1 IP1 BX001595; P.W. Sanders and E.A. Jaimes) from the Office of Research and Development, Medical Research Service, Department of Veterans Affairs, a National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases George M. O’Brien Kidney and Urological Research Centers Program Grant P30-DK-079337, and a Byrne Fund Grant (E.A. Jaimes) from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center funded these studies.
Adolescence is the developmental period most strongly associated with the initiation and escalation of substance use (Colder et al., 2002). Adolescent alcohol use is of concern because it is often associated with a variety of negative consequences including increased alcohol use later in life (Hawkins et al., 1997), decreased academic performance (Balsa et al., 2011), and illicit drug use (Hill et al., 2000). Understanding the factors that influence adolescent drinking is important for developing empirically supported etiological models and effective interventions. During adolescence, an increasing amount of time is spent outside of the home and in the context of peers (Spear, 2000), and peers are believed to play a central role in the initiation and escalation of adolescent alcohol use (Barnes et al., 2007). Adolescents are often motivated to align their behaviors and opinions with those of their peers in part because they have a strong desire to maintain close peer relationships and to be accepted by their peers groups (Collins and Steinberg, 2006). Thus, perceived peer norms (e.g., perceptions of the behaviors peers engage in as well as perceptions of behaviors peers approve of) are viewed as an important mechanism through which peers influence a variety of behaviors, including alcohol use (Borsari and Carey, 2001; Cialdini and Goldstein, 2004). In this study, we propose that the influence of perceived norms on adolescent early alcohol use is not uniform and test whether the strength of the association between perceived norms and alcohol use depends on the type of social norm (descriptive or injunctive), an adolescent’s social goals, and grade. Social Norms According to the Focus Theory of Normative Conduct, individuals adjust their behavior to match that of a relevant referent group because norms dictate what behaviors are socially acceptable (Cialdini and Goldstein, 2004). In this regard, social norms have been conceptualized as informal rules and standards that groups adopt to guide and constrain behavior (Cialdini and Trost, 1998). The evidence suggests that two types of perceived social norms are particularly relevant for understanding adolescent drinking behaviors, descriptive norms (perceptions of peer drinking) and injunctive norms (perceptions of the acceptability of peer drinking) (Borsari and Carey, 2001). Descriptive and injunctive norms have been associated with a variety of drinking behaviors in both cross-sectional and longitudinal studies (Collins and Spelman, 2013 Larimer et al., 2004; Read et al., 2002; Teunissen et al.

His flexibility in order to achieve certain caregiving ends. Yet this

His flexibility in order to achieve certain caregiving ends. Yet this flexibility is shaped by structural conditions that also create significant challenges for caregivers. Generalized poverty, a significant decline in bridewealth practices, and BAY 11-7083 site women’s increased access to education, land, and cash income all serve to make marriage more easily dissolvable or even less desirable to begin with. This lessens the power and appeal of patrilineal fosterage patterns. These trends are economically and ideologically ambiguous as maternal kin increasingly have both the burden and the privilege of caring for their daughters’ children, while children have narrowed options for receiving support. According to the ‘official kin’, the rules of child fostering are rigid and fixed. In practice, however, fostering allows for a wide array of household configurations that are negotiated based on a range of competing ideologies. As Alber notes in her study of child fostering in Benin, the lived experiences of people are ‘more flexible and varied than the rules suggest’ (2004: 36). Caregivers who are trying to legitimate their right to care for a child emphasize the rigidity of the rules because it allows them strategically to point to the ways in which others are contravening the rules. Comaroff suggests that negotiations around power are ‘mediated by the properties of a specific set of rules’ (1978: 17).While his study examines the claims to power of Tswana chiefs, I argue that these same processes are replicated on a smaller scale in the negotiations over relatedness that occur in everyday life in Lesotho. Matrilocal caregivers are able to negotiate for the care of children while maintaining the dominant ideology of patrilineal care. In doing so, caregivers have been able to manipulate the tenets of ‘official kin’ in order to achieve a range of caregiving outcomes, many of which legitimate matrilocal care within the patrilineal system. While these shifting values have markedly changed the caregiving landscape, they have yet to be formally institutionalized precisely because of the focus on patrilineality. In this way, maternal kin are reinforcing the patriarchal structure of the Basotho family in order to privilege their role as caregivers.Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author ManuscriptJ R Anthropol Inst. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2015 April 08.BlockPageAcknowledgmentsThis research was funded by the W.K. Kellogg Family Fellowship in Children and Families and the Population Studies and Training Center (PSTC) at Brown University. The PSTC receives core support from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (5R24HD041020). I would like to thank MCS staff and caregivers for all their help and support. I am grateful to my writing group at Brown (Adia Benton, Melissa Hackman, and LY-2523355 web Jennifer Stampe), and to Jessaca Leinaweaver and Mandy Terc for reading earlier versions of this article. Thank you to Justin Dyer for his careful copy-editing.Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author Manuscript
Female sex workers (FSWs) in China: social and behavioural studies and HIV prevention strategies Female sex work has a long-standing history in China as an integrated facet of social and economic life (Hershatter, 1997; Pan, 1997). Sex work became more visible in China starting in the late 1980s due to regular, government-ordered anti-prostitution crackdowns and growing epidemics of HI.His flexibility in order to achieve certain caregiving ends. Yet this flexibility is shaped by structural conditions that also create significant challenges for caregivers. Generalized poverty, a significant decline in bridewealth practices, and women’s increased access to education, land, and cash income all serve to make marriage more easily dissolvable or even less desirable to begin with. This lessens the power and appeal of patrilineal fosterage patterns. These trends are economically and ideologically ambiguous as maternal kin increasingly have both the burden and the privilege of caring for their daughters’ children, while children have narrowed options for receiving support. According to the ‘official kin’, the rules of child fostering are rigid and fixed. In practice, however, fostering allows for a wide array of household configurations that are negotiated based on a range of competing ideologies. As Alber notes in her study of child fostering in Benin, the lived experiences of people are ‘more flexible and varied than the rules suggest’ (2004: 36). Caregivers who are trying to legitimate their right to care for a child emphasize the rigidity of the rules because it allows them strategically to point to the ways in which others are contravening the rules. Comaroff suggests that negotiations around power are ‘mediated by the properties of a specific set of rules’ (1978: 17).While his study examines the claims to power of Tswana chiefs, I argue that these same processes are replicated on a smaller scale in the negotiations over relatedness that occur in everyday life in Lesotho. Matrilocal caregivers are able to negotiate for the care of children while maintaining the dominant ideology of patrilineal care. In doing so, caregivers have been able to manipulate the tenets of ‘official kin’ in order to achieve a range of caregiving outcomes, many of which legitimate matrilocal care within the patrilineal system. While these shifting values have markedly changed the caregiving landscape, they have yet to be formally institutionalized precisely because of the focus on patrilineality. In this way, maternal kin are reinforcing the patriarchal structure of the Basotho family in order to privilege their role as caregivers.Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author ManuscriptJ R Anthropol Inst. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2015 April 08.BlockPageAcknowledgmentsThis research was funded by the W.K. Kellogg Family Fellowship in Children and Families and the Population Studies and Training Center (PSTC) at Brown University. The PSTC receives core support from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (5R24HD041020). I would like to thank MCS staff and caregivers for all their help and support. I am grateful to my writing group at Brown (Adia Benton, Melissa Hackman, and Jennifer Stampe), and to Jessaca Leinaweaver and Mandy Terc for reading earlier versions of this article. Thank you to Justin Dyer for his careful copy-editing.Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author Manuscript
Female sex workers (FSWs) in China: social and behavioural studies and HIV prevention strategies Female sex work has a long-standing history in China as an integrated facet of social and economic life (Hershatter, 1997; Pan, 1997). Sex work became more visible in China starting in the late 1980s due to regular, government-ordered anti-prostitution crackdowns and growing epidemics of HI.

N sub-Saharan AfricaYesSomewhatNo?For mixed-methods studies, is there sufficient emphasis on

N sub-Saharan AfricaYesSomewhatNo?For mixed-methods studies, is there sufficient emphasis on the qualitative component? Are the study context and objectives clearly described?Study setting adequately described? Rationale for conducting the study stated and justified? Is there evidence of researcher reflexivity????Researcher’s role, potential bias and influence on respondents examined in formulation of questions, data collection and data analysis? Is the recruitment strategy appropriate to the study aims? Researcher explained how study informants were selected? Discussion around recruitment, i.e. why some people chose not to take part? Is the method of data collection clearly described and appropriate for the research question? Data collection method explicitly stated? Saturation of data discussed? Is the data Duvoglustat supplier analysis sufficiently rigorous?????Analytic process described in sufficient detail? If thematic analysis is used, is it clear how themes/categories were derived? Are contradictory data taken into account? Are conclusions supported by sufficient evidence??????Did the data provide sufficient depth, detail and richness? The researcher discussed credibility of their findings (triangulation, respondent validation, more than one analyst)?*Screening question, captured in inclusion criteria.on how informants’ responses or subsequent data analysis may have been influenced by the role of the research team. These observations are not unique to our literature review. As pointed out by Monocrotaline custom synthesis Glenton et al. (2013) in a Cochrane qualitative literature review, qualitative articles published in journals tend to provide relatively `thin’ data and are less likely to include a variety of data gathering methods. Glenton and others also reported lack of researcher reflexivity as a common finding when qualitative studies are being appraised. Longitudinal, ethnographic research may be better suited to qualitative studies that examine health interventions (Pawson et al. 2005, Glenton et al. 2013, Dawson et al. 2014), but such research is more time and resource demanding and often too extensive to be published in widely circulated health research journals. Thus, all the studies meeting the original inclusion criteria were included in the subsequent analysis regardless of the quality score assigned. Although some studies were deemed to be of lower methodological quality, the insights from stakeholders they presented nevertheless contributed to the richness of data and were informative for data synthesis. This is one of the approaches commonly adopted in qualitative reviews, especially when there are a limited number of studies available (Pawson et al. 2005, Hannes 2011).Data abstractionFollowing Thomas and Harden (2008), a thematic synthesis approach was used to compile the data. In following this approach, it is important to note the objective of this review ?to inform the study of task shifting for work being developed in Kenya. Given this aim, we were interested in `key concepts’ (Campbell et al. 2003) that might illuminate the characteristics of effective task-shifting programmes while highlighting the major barriers to implementation. Of course, we also needed to remain true to the texts we examined, all of the noted facets of implementation and the character of the reformed systems studied. In this way, although our aims were pragmatic and directed towards the needs of our future project, we were also aiming to provide as much `thick description’ as possible.N sub-Saharan AfricaYesSomewhatNo?For mixed-methods studies, is there sufficient emphasis on the qualitative component? Are the study context and objectives clearly described?Study setting adequately described? Rationale for conducting the study stated and justified? Is there evidence of researcher reflexivity????Researcher’s role, potential bias and influence on respondents examined in formulation of questions, data collection and data analysis? Is the recruitment strategy appropriate to the study aims? Researcher explained how study informants were selected? Discussion around recruitment, i.e. why some people chose not to take part? Is the method of data collection clearly described and appropriate for the research question? Data collection method explicitly stated? Saturation of data discussed? Is the data analysis sufficiently rigorous?????Analytic process described in sufficient detail? If thematic analysis is used, is it clear how themes/categories were derived? Are contradictory data taken into account? Are conclusions supported by sufficient evidence??????Did the data provide sufficient depth, detail and richness? The researcher discussed credibility of their findings (triangulation, respondent validation, more than one analyst)?*Screening question, captured in inclusion criteria.on how informants’ responses or subsequent data analysis may have been influenced by the role of the research team. These observations are not unique to our literature review. As pointed out by Glenton et al. (2013) in a Cochrane qualitative literature review, qualitative articles published in journals tend to provide relatively `thin’ data and are less likely to include a variety of data gathering methods. Glenton and others also reported lack of researcher reflexivity as a common finding when qualitative studies are being appraised. Longitudinal, ethnographic research may be better suited to qualitative studies that examine health interventions (Pawson et al. 2005, Glenton et al. 2013, Dawson et al. 2014), but such research is more time and resource demanding and often too extensive to be published in widely circulated health research journals. Thus, all the studies meeting the original inclusion criteria were included in the subsequent analysis regardless of the quality score assigned. Although some studies were deemed to be of lower methodological quality, the insights from stakeholders they presented nevertheless contributed to the richness of data and were informative for data synthesis. This is one of the approaches commonly adopted in qualitative reviews, especially when there are a limited number of studies available (Pawson et al. 2005, Hannes 2011).Data abstractionFollowing Thomas and Harden (2008), a thematic synthesis approach was used to compile the data. In following this approach, it is important to note the objective of this review ?to inform the study of task shifting for work being developed in Kenya. Given this aim, we were interested in `key concepts’ (Campbell et al. 2003) that might illuminate the characteristics of effective task-shifting programmes while highlighting the major barriers to implementation. Of course, we also needed to remain true to the texts we examined, all of the noted facets of implementation and the character of the reformed systems studied. In this way, although our aims were pragmatic and directed towards the needs of our future project, we were also aiming to provide as much `thick description’ as possible.

(and the BDFE) of tBu3PhOH.40 The EPR equilibration method provides

(and the BDFE) of tBu3PhOH.40 The EPR equilibration method provides a high degree of precision and the values are, in general, internally consistent.122 The values obtained agree very well with those from other methods, such as from E?and pKa measurements. For example, the adjusted Pedulli values for BDFE(PhOH) and BDFE(2,6-tBu2PhOH) in C6H6, = 83.8 and 78.3 kcal mol-1 (Table 4), agree very closely with our conversion of Bordwell’s BDFEs in DMSO (from E?and pKa values)116 to C6H6 using the Abraham method, 83.7 and 78.1 kcal mol-1, respectively. 5.2.3 Tyrosine–Redox reactions of the amino acid tyrosine are involved in order Thonzonium (bromide) biological energy transduction, charge transport, oxidative stress, and enzymatic AZD-8835 chemical information catalysis.123 The 1H+/1e- oxidized form, the tyrosyl radical, has been implicated in a variety of enzymatic systems, including ribonucleotide reductases,109 photosystem II,106 galactose oxidase,124 prostaglandin-H-synthase125 and perhaps cytochrome c oxidase.126 Furthermore, tyrosineNIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author ManuscriptChem Rev. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2011 December 8.Warren et al.Pageoxidation products are thought to play deleterious roles in various disease states, including atherosclerosis and aging.NIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author ManuscriptThe proton-coupled redox chemistry of tyrosine (TyrOH) and related compounds has been widely reported.128?29130131 In aqueous solutions, the Pourbaix diagram shows a clear 59 mV per pH dependence for the oxidation of tyrosine below pH 10, indicative of a 1e-/ 1H+ redox couple. As for phenol, above pKa(tyrosine) the redox potential does not depend on pH because this is the proton-independent TyrO?TyrO- redox couple. Other, more detailed, discussions of aspects of proton-coupled redox chemistry of tyrosine can be found in other contributions to this issue. As an aside, we encourage biochemical studies of PCET to use a nomenclature that explicitly shows the proton, such as `TyrOH’ for tyrosine, to avoid ambiguity. For instance, the commonly used “Y? for tyrosyl radicals could refer either to neutral radical TyrO?or to the typically high-energy radical cation TyrOH?. 5.2.4 -Tocopherol and Related Phenols—Tocopherol (a main component of Vitamin E) is thought to be a key chain breaking antioxidant in biological systems. Since its discovery in 1922,132 vitamin E has received considerable attention from chemists, biologists, and clinicians, among others.110 Due to its insolubility in water, several small water soluble analogs such as Trolox C ((?-6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchromane-2carboxylic acid) and HPMC (6-hydroxy-2,2-5,7,8-pentamethylchroman) have been developed (Scheme 8; see references 133 and 134). As shown in Table 4, these three phenols show similar thermochemistry in the same solvent. This is in good agreement with their solution kinetic behavior and indicates that the analogs lacking the greasy phytyl tails are good models for the redox chemistry of tocopherol. The BDFEs of these phenols are much lower than those of other phenols, by more than 10 kcal mol-1 vs. unsubstituted phenol and by 2 kcal mol-1 vs. tBu3PhOH in the same solvent. This relatively weak bond is the origin of the good biological reducing power of vitamin E. The weak bond is a result of the electron-donating substituents, which also reduces the acidity of these phenols. The combination of a weak O bond, low acidity, and a high outer-sphere redox.(and the BDFE) of tBu3PhOH.40 The EPR equilibration method provides a high degree of precision and the values are, in general, internally consistent.122 The values obtained agree very well with those from other methods, such as from E?and pKa measurements. For example, the adjusted Pedulli values for BDFE(PhOH) and BDFE(2,6-tBu2PhOH) in C6H6, = 83.8 and 78.3 kcal mol-1 (Table 4), agree very closely with our conversion of Bordwell’s BDFEs in DMSO (from E?and pKa values)116 to C6H6 using the Abraham method, 83.7 and 78.1 kcal mol-1, respectively. 5.2.3 Tyrosine–Redox reactions of the amino acid tyrosine are involved in biological energy transduction, charge transport, oxidative stress, and enzymatic catalysis.123 The 1H+/1e- oxidized form, the tyrosyl radical, has been implicated in a variety of enzymatic systems, including ribonucleotide reductases,109 photosystem II,106 galactose oxidase,124 prostaglandin-H-synthase125 and perhaps cytochrome c oxidase.126 Furthermore, tyrosineNIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author ManuscriptChem Rev. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2011 December 8.Warren et al.Pageoxidation products are thought to play deleterious roles in various disease states, including atherosclerosis and aging.NIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author ManuscriptThe proton-coupled redox chemistry of tyrosine (TyrOH) and related compounds has been widely reported.128?29130131 In aqueous solutions, the Pourbaix diagram shows a clear 59 mV per pH dependence for the oxidation of tyrosine below pH 10, indicative of a 1e-/ 1H+ redox couple. As for phenol, above pKa(tyrosine) the redox potential does not depend on pH because this is the proton-independent TyrO?TyrO- redox couple. Other, more detailed, discussions of aspects of proton-coupled redox chemistry of tyrosine can be found in other contributions to this issue. As an aside, we encourage biochemical studies of PCET to use a nomenclature that explicitly shows the proton, such as `TyrOH’ for tyrosine, to avoid ambiguity. For instance, the commonly used “Y? for tyrosyl radicals could refer either to neutral radical TyrO?or to the typically high-energy radical cation TyrOH?. 5.2.4 -Tocopherol and Related Phenols—Tocopherol (a main component of Vitamin E) is thought to be a key chain breaking antioxidant in biological systems. Since its discovery in 1922,132 vitamin E has received considerable attention from chemists, biologists, and clinicians, among others.110 Due to its insolubility in water, several small water soluble analogs such as Trolox C ((?-6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchromane-2carboxylic acid) and HPMC (6-hydroxy-2,2-5,7,8-pentamethylchroman) have been developed (Scheme 8; see references 133 and 134). As shown in Table 4, these three phenols show similar thermochemistry in the same solvent. This is in good agreement with their solution kinetic behavior and indicates that the analogs lacking the greasy phytyl tails are good models for the redox chemistry of tocopherol. The BDFEs of these phenols are much lower than those of other phenols, by more than 10 kcal mol-1 vs. unsubstituted phenol and by 2 kcal mol-1 vs. tBu3PhOH in the same solvent. This relatively weak bond is the origin of the good biological reducing power of vitamin E. The weak bond is a result of the electron-donating substituents, which also reduces the acidity of these phenols. The combination of a weak O bond, low acidity, and a high outer-sphere redox.

Tobal, Rio Blanco Abajo, 04.iv.2002, 500m, 10.90037, -85.37254, DHJPAR0002960. Paratypes. 40 , 6 (BMNH, CNC

Tobal, Rio Blanco Abajo, 04.iv.2002, 500m, 10.90037, -85.37254, DHJPAR0002960. Paratypes. 40 , 6 (BMNH, CNC, INBIO, INHS, NMNH). COSTA RICA, ACG database codes: See Appendix 2 for detailed label data. Description. Female. Body color: body mostly dark except for some sternites which may be pale. Antenna color: scape, pedicel, and flagellum dark. Coxae color (pro-, meso, metacoxa): dark, dark, dark. Femora color (pro-, meso-, metafemur): anteriorly dark/ posteriorly pale, dark, dark. Tibiae color (pro-, meso-, metatibia): pale, pale, anteriorly pale/posteriorly dark. Tegula and humeral complex color: tegula pale, humeral complex half pale/half dark. Pterostigma color: mostly pale and/or transparent, with thin dark borders. Fore wing veins color: partially pigmented (a few veins may be dark but most are pale). Antenna length/body length: antenna about as long as body (head to apex of metasoma); if slightly shorter, at least extending beyond ARRY-334543 cost anterior 0.7 metasoma length. Body in lateral view: not distinctly flattened dorso entrally. Body I-BRD9 custom synthesis length (head to apex of metasoma): 2.9?.0 mm, 3.1?.2 mm, rarely 2.0 mm or less or 3.3?.4 mm. Fore wing length: 2.9?.0 mm, 3.1?.2 mm, rarely 2.0 mm or less or 3.3?.4 mm. Ocular cellar line/posterior ocellus diameter: 2.3?.5, rarely 2.0?.2. Interocellar distance/ posterior ocellus diameter: 1.7?.9. Antennal flagellomerus 2 length/width: 2.6?.8. Antennal flagellomerus 14 length/width: 1.4?.6. Length of flagellomerus 2/length of flagellomerus 14: 2.0?.2. Tarsal claws: with single basal spine ike seta. Metafemur length/width: 3.2?.3. Metatibia inner spur length/metabasitarsus length: 0.4?.5. Anteromesoscutum: mostly with deep, dense punctures (separated by less than 2.0 ?its maximum diameter). Mesoscutellar disc: with punctures near margins, central part mostly smooth. Number of pits in scutoscutellar sulcus: 5 or 6 or 7 or 8. Maximum height of mesoscutellum lunules/maximum height of lateral face of mesoscutellum: 0.4?0.5. Propodeum areola: completely defined by carinae, including transverse carina extending to spiracle. Propodeum background sculpture: mostly sculptured. Mediotergite 1 length/width at posterior margin: 2.0?.2. Mediotergite 1 shape: mostly parallel ided for 0.5?.7 of its length, then narrowing posteriorly so mediotergite anterior width >1.1 ?posterior width. Mediotergite 1 sculpture: mostly sculptured, excavated area centrally with transverse striation inside and/or a polished knob centrally on posterior margin of mediotergite. Mediotergite 2 width at posterior margin/length: 2.8?.1. Mediotergite 2 sculpture: mostly smooth. Outer margin of hypopygium: with a wide, medially folded,Review of Apanteles sensu stricto (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Microgastrinae)…transparent, semi esclerotized area; usually with 4 or more pleats. Ovipositor thickness: about same width throughout its length. Ovipositor sheaths length/metatibial length: 1.6?.7, rarely 1.2?.3. Length of fore wing veins r/2RS: 1.7?.9. Length of fore wing veins 2RS/2M: 0.9?.0. Length of fore wing veins 2M/(RS+M)b: 0.9?.0. Pterostigma length/width: 3.6 or more. Point of insertion of vein r in pterostigma: clearly beyond half way point length of pterostigma. Angle of vein r with fore wing anterior margin: clearly outwards, inclined towards fore wing apex. Shape of junction of veins r and 2RS in fore wing: distinctly but not strongly angled. Male. As in female but with darker legs and smoother mediotergite 1. Molecular data. Sequences in BOLD:.Tobal, Rio Blanco Abajo, 04.iv.2002, 500m, 10.90037, -85.37254, DHJPAR0002960. Paratypes. 40 , 6 (BMNH, CNC, INBIO, INHS, NMNH). COSTA RICA, ACG database codes: See Appendix 2 for detailed label data. Description. Female. Body color: body mostly dark except for some sternites which may be pale. Antenna color: scape, pedicel, and flagellum dark. Coxae color (pro-, meso, metacoxa): dark, dark, dark. Femora color (pro-, meso-, metafemur): anteriorly dark/ posteriorly pale, dark, dark. Tibiae color (pro-, meso-, metatibia): pale, pale, anteriorly pale/posteriorly dark. Tegula and humeral complex color: tegula pale, humeral complex half pale/half dark. Pterostigma color: mostly pale and/or transparent, with thin dark borders. Fore wing veins color: partially pigmented (a few veins may be dark but most are pale). Antenna length/body length: antenna about as long as body (head to apex of metasoma); if slightly shorter, at least extending beyond anterior 0.7 metasoma length. Body in lateral view: not distinctly flattened dorso entrally. Body length (head to apex of metasoma): 2.9?.0 mm, 3.1?.2 mm, rarely 2.0 mm or less or 3.3?.4 mm. Fore wing length: 2.9?.0 mm, 3.1?.2 mm, rarely 2.0 mm or less or 3.3?.4 mm. Ocular cellar line/posterior ocellus diameter: 2.3?.5, rarely 2.0?.2. Interocellar distance/ posterior ocellus diameter: 1.7?.9. Antennal flagellomerus 2 length/width: 2.6?.8. Antennal flagellomerus 14 length/width: 1.4?.6. Length of flagellomerus 2/length of flagellomerus 14: 2.0?.2. Tarsal claws: with single basal spine ike seta. Metafemur length/width: 3.2?.3. Metatibia inner spur length/metabasitarsus length: 0.4?.5. Anteromesoscutum: mostly with deep, dense punctures (separated by less than 2.0 ?its maximum diameter). Mesoscutellar disc: with punctures near margins, central part mostly smooth. Number of pits in scutoscutellar sulcus: 5 or 6 or 7 or 8. Maximum height of mesoscutellum lunules/maximum height of lateral face of mesoscutellum: 0.4?0.5. Propodeum areola: completely defined by carinae, including transverse carina extending to spiracle. Propodeum background sculpture: mostly sculptured. Mediotergite 1 length/width at posterior margin: 2.0?.2. Mediotergite 1 shape: mostly parallel ided for 0.5?.7 of its length, then narrowing posteriorly so mediotergite anterior width >1.1 ?posterior width. Mediotergite 1 sculpture: mostly sculptured, excavated area centrally with transverse striation inside and/or a polished knob centrally on posterior margin of mediotergite. Mediotergite 2 width at posterior margin/length: 2.8?.1. Mediotergite 2 sculpture: mostly smooth. Outer margin of hypopygium: with a wide, medially folded,Review of Apanteles sensu stricto (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Microgastrinae)…transparent, semi esclerotized area; usually with 4 or more pleats. Ovipositor thickness: about same width throughout its length. Ovipositor sheaths length/metatibial length: 1.6?.7, rarely 1.2?.3. Length of fore wing veins r/2RS: 1.7?.9. Length of fore wing veins 2RS/2M: 0.9?.0. Length of fore wing veins 2M/(RS+M)b: 0.9?.0. Pterostigma length/width: 3.6 or more. Point of insertion of vein r in pterostigma: clearly beyond half way point length of pterostigma. Angle of vein r with fore wing anterior margin: clearly outwards, inclined towards fore wing apex. Shape of junction of veins r and 2RS in fore wing: distinctly but not strongly angled. Male. As in female but with darker legs and smoother mediotergite 1. Molecular data. Sequences in BOLD:.

A six-min incubation with Gentle Cell Dissociation Reagent followed by complete

A six-min incubation with Gentle Cell Dissociation Reagent followed by complete physical GW0742MedChemExpress GW0742 dispersions by repeated pipetting. Large cells (>70 m) were then collected by passing the suspension successively through a series of nylon cell strainers (70 m and 40 m, Fisher Avasimibe site Scientific) to generate three cell size fractions (>70 m, 40?0 m, and <40 m). The captured cells on the strainer were recovered by inverting the strainer and rinsing with culture medium. Similarly, middle size cells (40?0 m) were obtained from the <70-m fraction by collection on a 40-m cell strainer after removal of <70-m cells. The three size fractions were used in all subsequent analyses. Portions of the size-fractioned cells were fixed in 4 (vol/vol) paraformaldehyde/PBS solution for 15 min and resuspended (5.0 ?102 and 1.0 ?105 cells/100 L PBS). The suspensions were loaded into a Shandon single cytofunnel and centrifuged for 5 min at 1,000 ?g in a Shandon CytoSpin 4 cytocentrifuge (Thermo Scientific). Derivation Primary Human PHTu and PHTd. Placental tissue samples were collected by the Obstetrical Specimen Procurement Unit at Magee-Womens Hospital of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. The work was performed under an exempt protocol approved by the Institutional Review Board (IRB) at the University of Pittsburgh. Under the protocol, patients provided written consent for the use of deidentified discarded tissues for research upon admittance to the hospital. Primary villous PHTs were derived and cultured according to published procedures (12, 49, 50) from three term human placentas (one female and two males). Multiple primary cultures were established from each placenta at a density of 3.5 ?105 cells/cm2 in DMEM supplemented with 10 (vol/vol) FBS and antibiotics under a 5 (vol/vol) CO2/air atmosphere at 37 . Triplicate cultures from each placenta were harvested at 9 h (PHTu) before syncytium formation and subsequently at 48 h (PHTd) when syncytium formation had occurred. The sieving technique used for the hESC-derived cells was thus unnecessary for the term placental STB. Total RNA was extracted from each sample (3 ?3 at 9 h and 48 h, respectively) to provide a total of 18 samples for RNA-seq analysis. Additional methods are described in SI Appendix, SI Materials and Methods. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS. We thank L. C. Schulz for her critical reading of the manuscript and her helpful comments; N. J. Bivens for RNA-seq; W. Spollen, C. Bottoms, and S. Givan for their sequence data analysis; Y. Tian for immunoassays; A. Jurkevich for technical assistance; M. Schauflinger, D. Grant, and T. A. White for sharing equipment; and D. F. Reith for his editorial assistance and administrative support. This study was supported by NIH Grant R01HD077108 (to T.E. and D.J.S.) and Grant R01HD067759 (to R.M.R.).7. Loke YW, King A (1995) Human Implantation: Cell Biology and Immunology (Cambridge Univ Press, Cambridge). 8. Miller RK, et al. (2005) Human placental explants in culture: Approaches and assessments. Placenta 26(6):439?48. 9. Sim CM, Sibley CP, Jones CJ, Turner MA, Greenwood SL (2001) The functional regeneration of syncytiotrophoblast in cultured explants of term placenta. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 280(4):R1116 1122. 10. Wice B, Menton D, Geuze H, Schwartz AL (1990) Modulators of cyclic AMP metabolism induce syncytiotrophoblast formation in vitro. Exp Cell Res 186(2):306?16. 11. Orendi K, Gauster M, Moser G, Meiri H, Huppertz B (2010) The choriocarcinoma cell line BeW.A six-min incubation with Gentle Cell Dissociation Reagent followed by complete physical dispersions by repeated pipetting. Large cells (>70 m) were then collected by passing the suspension successively through a series of nylon cell strainers (70 m and 40 m, Fisher Scientific) to generate three cell size fractions (>70 m, 40?0 m, and <40 m). The captured cells on the strainer were recovered by inverting the strainer and rinsing with culture medium. Similarly, middle size cells (40?0 m) were obtained from the <70-m fraction by collection on a 40-m cell strainer after removal of <70-m cells. The three size fractions were used in all subsequent analyses. Portions of the size-fractioned cells were fixed in 4 (vol/vol) paraformaldehyde/PBS solution for 15 min and resuspended (5.0 ?102 and 1.0 ?105 cells/100 L PBS). The suspensions were loaded into a Shandon single cytofunnel and centrifuged for 5 min at 1,000 ?g in a Shandon CytoSpin 4 cytocentrifuge (Thermo Scientific). Derivation Primary Human PHTu and PHTd. Placental tissue samples were collected by the Obstetrical Specimen Procurement Unit at Magee-Womens Hospital of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. The work was performed under an exempt protocol approved by the Institutional Review Board (IRB) at the University of Pittsburgh. Under the protocol, patients provided written consent for the use of deidentified discarded tissues for research upon admittance to the hospital. Primary villous PHTs were derived and cultured according to published procedures (12, 49, 50) from three term human placentas (one female and two males). Multiple primary cultures were established from each placenta at a density of 3.5 ?105 cells/cm2 in DMEM supplemented with 10 (vol/vol) FBS and antibiotics under a 5 (vol/vol) CO2/air atmosphere at 37 . Triplicate cultures from each placenta were harvested at 9 h (PHTu) before syncytium formation and subsequently at 48 h (PHTd) when syncytium formation had occurred. The sieving technique used for the hESC-derived cells was thus unnecessary for the term placental STB. Total RNA was extracted from each sample (3 ?3 at 9 h and 48 h, respectively) to provide a total of 18 samples for RNA-seq analysis. Additional methods are described in SI Appendix, SI Materials and Methods. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS. We thank L. C. Schulz for her critical reading of the manuscript and her helpful comments; N. J. Bivens for RNA-seq; W. Spollen, C. Bottoms, and S. Givan for their sequence data analysis; Y. Tian for immunoassays; A. Jurkevich for technical assistance; M. Schauflinger, D. Grant, and T. A. White for sharing equipment; and D. F. Reith for his editorial assistance and administrative support. This study was supported by NIH Grant R01HD077108 (to T.E. and D.J.S.) and Grant R01HD067759 (to R.M.R.).7. Loke YW, King A (1995) Human Implantation: Cell Biology and Immunology (Cambridge Univ Press, Cambridge). 8. Miller RK, et al. (2005) Human placental explants in culture: Approaches and assessments. Placenta 26(6):439?48. 9. Sim CM, Sibley CP, Jones CJ, Turner MA, Greenwood SL (2001) The functional regeneration of syncytiotrophoblast in cultured explants of term placenta. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 280(4):R1116 1122. 10. Wice B, Menton D, Geuze H, Schwartz AL (1990) Modulators of cyclic AMP metabolism induce syncytiotrophoblast formation in vitro. Exp Cell Res 186(2):306?16. 11. Orendi K, Gauster M, Moser G, Meiri H, Huppertz B (2010) The choriocarcinoma cell line BeW.