Inary levels of discrimination and social, political and economic marginalization, including

Inary levels of discrimination and social, political and economic marginalization, including disease-related social stigma (alleged carriers of HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis) and officially-sanctioned detention (Boswell, 1982; Stepick, 1998). Given these challenging life circumstances, Haitian immigrants are particularly predisposed to draw on the resources and networks found within the church (Stepick, 1998). The present findings of higher rates of church T0901317MedChemExpress T0901317 membership, participation in church activities, prayer, and stated importance of children’s religious training among Haitian immigrants are consistent with research demonstrating high levels of service attendance among this group (Stepick, 1998) and the central position of churches in providing social, cultural and community resources (Richmond, 2005; Stepick et al., 2009). A slightly different pattern of findings for persons from Trinidad and Tobago (higher levels of church membership, but lower levels of service attendance) are interesting and require further study. Explanations for the observed significant country of origin differences in religious involvement for immigrants from Haiti and Trinidad and Tobago are multifaceted and complex. Subsequent research on the noted social, cultural, psychological and civicRev Relig Res. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2011 December 1.NIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author ManuscriptTaylor et al.Pagefunctions of Caribbean immigrant worship Thonzonium (bromide) clinical trials communities can explore in more detail the factors and processes associated with religious expression and involvement.NIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author ManuscriptIn conclusion, this is the first paper on the demographic correlates of religious participation among a national sample of Black Carribean adults. The availability of a nationally representative sample of Caribbean Blacks, was a definite advantage of the study and provides an important complement to small and geographically situated ethnographic studies of religious involvement among Black Caribbean communities. Despite these advantages, the findings are limited by restrictions in the sample. The Black Caribbean sample excludes individuals who do not speak English (i.e., persons who only speak Spanish, Haitian-French, or Creole dialects) and, as a consequence, the study findings are not generalizable to these groups of Caribbean Blacks. Nonetheless, the significant advantages of the national probability sample, methods, and analysis provide a unique opportunity to examine demographic differences in religiosity across multiple measures of religious participation. In addition, specific findings for country of origin and immigration status differences suggest important new areas of study for religious involvement among Caribbean Blacks. Taken together, these findings lay the groundwork for future investigations of religious involvement both within this population and in comparison to other race, ethnic and immigrant groups.
NIH Public AccessAuthor ManuscriptJ Cogn Dev. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2011 July 7.Published in final edited form as: J Cogn Dev. 2010 ; 11(2): 121?36. doi:10.1080/15248371003699969.NIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author ManuscriptTwelve Frequently Asked Questions About Growth Curve ModelingPatrick J. Curran, Khawla Obeidat, and Diane Losardo University of North Carolina at Chapel HillAbstractLongitudinal data analysis has long played a signifi.Inary levels of discrimination and social, political and economic marginalization, including disease-related social stigma (alleged carriers of HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis) and officially-sanctioned detention (Boswell, 1982; Stepick, 1998). Given these challenging life circumstances, Haitian immigrants are particularly predisposed to draw on the resources and networks found within the church (Stepick, 1998). The present findings of higher rates of church membership, participation in church activities, prayer, and stated importance of children’s religious training among Haitian immigrants are consistent with research demonstrating high levels of service attendance among this group (Stepick, 1998) and the central position of churches in providing social, cultural and community resources (Richmond, 2005; Stepick et al., 2009). A slightly different pattern of findings for persons from Trinidad and Tobago (higher levels of church membership, but lower levels of service attendance) are interesting and require further study. Explanations for the observed significant country of origin differences in religious involvement for immigrants from Haiti and Trinidad and Tobago are multifaceted and complex. Subsequent research on the noted social, cultural, psychological and civicRev Relig Res. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2011 December 1.NIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author ManuscriptTaylor et al.Pagefunctions of Caribbean immigrant worship communities can explore in more detail the factors and processes associated with religious expression and involvement.NIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author ManuscriptIn conclusion, this is the first paper on the demographic correlates of religious participation among a national sample of Black Carribean adults. The availability of a nationally representative sample of Caribbean Blacks, was a definite advantage of the study and provides an important complement to small and geographically situated ethnographic studies of religious involvement among Black Caribbean communities. Despite these advantages, the findings are limited by restrictions in the sample. The Black Caribbean sample excludes individuals who do not speak English (i.e., persons who only speak Spanish, Haitian-French, or Creole dialects) and, as a consequence, the study findings are not generalizable to these groups of Caribbean Blacks. Nonetheless, the significant advantages of the national probability sample, methods, and analysis provide a unique opportunity to examine demographic differences in religiosity across multiple measures of religious participation. In addition, specific findings for country of origin and immigration status differences suggest important new areas of study for religious involvement among Caribbean Blacks. Taken together, these findings lay the groundwork for future investigations of religious involvement both within this population and in comparison to other race, ethnic and immigrant groups.
NIH Public AccessAuthor ManuscriptJ Cogn Dev. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2011 July 7.Published in final edited form as: J Cogn Dev. 2010 ; 11(2): 121?36. doi:10.1080/15248371003699969.NIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author ManuscriptTwelve Frequently Asked Questions About Growth Curve ModelingPatrick J. Curran, Khawla Obeidat, and Diane Losardo University of North Carolina at Chapel HillAbstractLongitudinal data analysis has long played a signifi.

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