D ETS-1 blockade have beneficial additive effects on renal injury, suggesting

D ETS-1 blockade have beneficial additive effects on renal injury, suggesting that concomitant blockade of RAS and ETS-1 could be a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment and prevention of end-organ injury in PD150606MedChemExpress PD150606 hypertension.Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author ManuscriptAcknowledgmentsWe are grateful for the support of Core Facilities at the O’Brien Kidney Center at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Sources of Funding A Merit Review Award (E.A. Jaimes), a Research Grant (1 IP1 BX001595; P.W. Sanders and E.A. Jaimes) from the Office of Research and Development, Medical Research Service, Department of Veterans Affairs, a National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases George M. O’Brien Kidney and Urological Research Centers Program Grant P30-DK-079337, and a Byrne Fund Grant (E.A. Jaimes) from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center funded these studies.
Adolescence is the developmental period most strongly associated with the initiation and escalation of substance use (Colder et al., 2002). Adolescent alcohol use is of concern because it is often associated with a variety of negative consequences including increased alcohol use later in life (Hawkins et al., 1997), decreased academic performance (Balsa et al., 2011), and illicit drug use (Hill et al., 2000). Understanding the factors that influence adolescent drinking is important for developing empirically supported etiological models and effective interventions. During adolescence, an increasing amount of time is spent outside of the home and in the context of peers (Spear, 2000), and peers are believed to play a central role in the initiation and escalation of adolescent alcohol use (Barnes et al., 2007). Adolescents are often motivated to align their behaviors and opinions with those of their peers in part because they have a strong PM01183 clinical trials desire to maintain close peer relationships and to be accepted by their peers groups (Collins and Steinberg, 2006). Thus, perceived peer norms (e.g., perceptions of the behaviors peers engage in as well as perceptions of behaviors peers approve of) are viewed as an important mechanism through which peers influence a variety of behaviors, including alcohol use (Borsari and Carey, 2001; Cialdini and Goldstein, 2004). In this study, we propose that the influence of perceived norms on adolescent early alcohol use is not uniform and test whether the strength of the association between perceived norms and alcohol use depends on the type of social norm (descriptive or injunctive), an adolescent’s social goals, and grade. Social Norms According to the Focus Theory of Normative Conduct, individuals adjust their behavior to match that of a relevant referent group because norms dictate what behaviors are socially acceptable (Cialdini and Goldstein, 2004). In this regard, social norms have been conceptualized as informal rules and standards that groups adopt to guide and constrain behavior (Cialdini and Trost, 1998). The evidence suggests that two types of perceived social norms are particularly relevant for understanding adolescent drinking behaviors, descriptive norms (perceptions of peer drinking) and injunctive norms (perceptions of the acceptability of peer drinking) (Borsari and Carey, 2001). Descriptive and injunctive norms have been associated with a variety of drinking behaviors in both cross-sectional and longitudinal studies (Collins and Spelman, 2013 Larimer et al., 2004; Read et al., 2002; Teunissen et al.D ETS-1 blockade have beneficial additive effects on renal injury, suggesting that concomitant blockade of RAS and ETS-1 could be a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment and prevention of end-organ injury in hypertension.Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author ManuscriptAcknowledgmentsWe are grateful for the support of Core Facilities at the O’Brien Kidney Center at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Sources of Funding A Merit Review Award (E.A. Jaimes), a Research Grant (1 IP1 BX001595; P.W. Sanders and E.A. Jaimes) from the Office of Research and Development, Medical Research Service, Department of Veterans Affairs, a National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases George M. O’Brien Kidney and Urological Research Centers Program Grant P30-DK-079337, and a Byrne Fund Grant (E.A. Jaimes) from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center funded these studies.
Adolescence is the developmental period most strongly associated with the initiation and escalation of substance use (Colder et al., 2002). Adolescent alcohol use is of concern because it is often associated with a variety of negative consequences including increased alcohol use later in life (Hawkins et al., 1997), decreased academic performance (Balsa et al., 2011), and illicit drug use (Hill et al., 2000). Understanding the factors that influence adolescent drinking is important for developing empirically supported etiological models and effective interventions. During adolescence, an increasing amount of time is spent outside of the home and in the context of peers (Spear, 2000), and peers are believed to play a central role in the initiation and escalation of adolescent alcohol use (Barnes et al., 2007). Adolescents are often motivated to align their behaviors and opinions with those of their peers in part because they have a strong desire to maintain close peer relationships and to be accepted by their peers groups (Collins and Steinberg, 2006). Thus, perceived peer norms (e.g., perceptions of the behaviors peers engage in as well as perceptions of behaviors peers approve of) are viewed as an important mechanism through which peers influence a variety of behaviors, including alcohol use (Borsari and Carey, 2001; Cialdini and Goldstein, 2004). In this study, we propose that the influence of perceived norms on adolescent early alcohol use is not uniform and test whether the strength of the association between perceived norms and alcohol use depends on the type of social norm (descriptive or injunctive), an adolescent’s social goals, and grade. Social Norms According to the Focus Theory of Normative Conduct, individuals adjust their behavior to match that of a relevant referent group because norms dictate what behaviors are socially acceptable (Cialdini and Goldstein, 2004). In this regard, social norms have been conceptualized as informal rules and standards that groups adopt to guide and constrain behavior (Cialdini and Trost, 1998). The evidence suggests that two types of perceived social norms are particularly relevant for understanding adolescent drinking behaviors, descriptive norms (perceptions of peer drinking) and injunctive norms (perceptions of the acceptability of peer drinking) (Borsari and Carey, 2001). Descriptive and injunctive norms have been associated with a variety of drinking behaviors in both cross-sectional and longitudinal studies (Collins and Spelman, 2013 Larimer et al., 2004; Read et al., 2002; Teunissen et al.

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