R Valley Survey [10, 83]. Here, the assemblages have been standardized in terms

R Valley Survey [10, 83]. Here, the Varlitinib dose assemblages have been standardized in terms of type descriptions and are all of sufficient sample sizes. The error bars indicate the 99 confidence interval for the type frequencies. The largest seriation solutions formed eight spatial sets. The assemblage from Parkin (11-N-1) falls into two SCR7 site different sets, suggesting that it served as a central node of interaction between communities. The Holden Lake assemblage appears as a valid addition to all solutions, supporting the idea that it is earlier than the other samples in the analysis. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0124942.gUsing a subset of data from the LMV assemblages and new ceramic collections from seven deposits in northeastern Arkansas [32, 83] and shown in Table 2, Lipo used seriation-based techniques and simulations of cultural transmission to account for patterns of stylistic similarity in varying spatial and temporal configurations among 20 late prehistoric locations. Through his analysis, Lipo [80, 83] demonstrated that data generated from the original collections are well suited for examining transmission. In his analysis, Lipo [80, 83] constructed deterministic seriations for the assemblages using a manual graphical technique and found that no single solution could be obtained using the 20 assemblages. Instead, fpsyg.2016.01503 the set of assemblages had to divided into 8 different spatial groups (Figs 9 and 10). These groups reflected the effects of local transmission among communities that overwhelms the effects of longer-range interaction within the region. Interestingly, two valid seriation solutions in the “Parkin” area (Groups 2 and 3 in Fig 10) overlap with one another in that they both share the assemblage 11-N-1, the Parkin site. Lipo [83] explained this result asPLOS ONE | DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0124942 April 29,19 /The IDSS Frequency Seriation AlgorithmFig 10. Spatial distribution of seriation groups with St. Francis and Memphis Assemblages consisting of Lipo [84] and Phillips et al. [10] samples. Labels for groups refer to seriation solutions numbered in Fig 9. While each seriation group also includes Holden Lake, this assemblage is removed here for visual clarity. The groups are strongly spatial in their configuration. Interestingly, the Parkin (11-N-1) assemblage falls into groups 2 and 3 suggesting that it served as a central node, possibly indicating emerging social complexity. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0124942.gPLOS ONE | DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0124942 April 29,20 /The IDSS Frequency Seriation Algorithmthe effect of Parkin acting as a central “node” in a network and possibly indicative of emerging social complexity among otherwise functionally redundant settlements. While Lipo’s result demonstrates the potential for seriation as a means of explaining patterns of cultural transmission, the results and the approach as a whole are limited in practical utility for several reasons. First, the seriation results jir.2010.0097 were created by hand sorting following graphic methods outlined by Ford [6, 10] though assisted using spreadsheet macros in Microsoft Excel [83]. Consequently, we have no way of knowing whether the final sets of orders are the largest set or whether all possible solutions are represented. Second, while Lipo created confidence intervals for each class frequency and tested the pairwise ordering of assemblages, the inability to assess the chosen solution with respect to the entire search space limits confidence in the results. Finally, the us.R Valley Survey [10, 83]. Here, the assemblages have been standardized in terms of type descriptions and are all of sufficient sample sizes. The error bars indicate the 99 confidence interval for the type frequencies. The largest seriation solutions formed eight spatial sets. The assemblage from Parkin (11-N-1) falls into two different sets, suggesting that it served as a central node of interaction between communities. The Holden Lake assemblage appears as a valid addition to all solutions, supporting the idea that it is earlier than the other samples in the analysis. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0124942.gUsing a subset of data from the LMV assemblages and new ceramic collections from seven deposits in northeastern Arkansas [32, 83] and shown in Table 2, Lipo used seriation-based techniques and simulations of cultural transmission to account for patterns of stylistic similarity in varying spatial and temporal configurations among 20 late prehistoric locations. Through his analysis, Lipo [80, 83] demonstrated that data generated from the original collections are well suited for examining transmission. In his analysis, Lipo [80, 83] constructed deterministic seriations for the assemblages using a manual graphical technique and found that no single solution could be obtained using the 20 assemblages. Instead, fpsyg.2016.01503 the set of assemblages had to divided into 8 different spatial groups (Figs 9 and 10). These groups reflected the effects of local transmission among communities that overwhelms the effects of longer-range interaction within the region. Interestingly, two valid seriation solutions in the “Parkin” area (Groups 2 and 3 in Fig 10) overlap with one another in that they both share the assemblage 11-N-1, the Parkin site. Lipo [83] explained this result asPLOS ONE | DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0124942 April 29,19 /The IDSS Frequency Seriation AlgorithmFig 10. Spatial distribution of seriation groups with St. Francis and Memphis Assemblages consisting of Lipo [84] and Phillips et al. [10] samples. Labels for groups refer to seriation solutions numbered in Fig 9. While each seriation group also includes Holden Lake, this assemblage is removed here for visual clarity. The groups are strongly spatial in their configuration. Interestingly, the Parkin (11-N-1) assemblage falls into groups 2 and 3 suggesting that it served as a central node, possibly indicating emerging social complexity. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0124942.gPLOS ONE | DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0124942 April 29,20 /The IDSS Frequency Seriation Algorithmthe effect of Parkin acting as a central “node” in a network and possibly indicative of emerging social complexity among otherwise functionally redundant settlements. While Lipo’s result demonstrates the potential for seriation as a means of explaining patterns of cultural transmission, the results and the approach as a whole are limited in practical utility for several reasons. First, the seriation results jir.2010.0097 were created by hand sorting following graphic methods outlined by Ford [6, 10] though assisted using spreadsheet macros in Microsoft Excel [83]. Consequently, we have no way of knowing whether the final sets of orders are the largest set or whether all possible solutions are represented. Second, while Lipo created confidence intervals for each class frequency and tested the pairwise ordering of assemblages, the inability to assess the chosen solution with respect to the entire search space limits confidence in the results. Finally, the us.

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