Racy. It is best to use plain language for these messages

Racy. It is best to use plain language for these messages so that community members can easily understand them. Messages should: ?Be simple, clear, and direct; ?Use the fewest words needed to convey jasp.12117 key information; ?Communicate one to three key points at most; ?Be free of jargon and aimed at approximately a sixth-grade reading level (guidelines on simplifying messages can be found in the U.S. government’s Plain Language Action and Information Network Quick Reference Guide12 and the Clear Communication Index);13 ?Be translated in appropriate languages for communities; and?Be framed in positive terms (i.e., focused on what to do as opposed to what not to do). Step 8: use a variety of methods to convey and amplify messages Health department communications and community mobilization teams may find it useful to disseminate health messages through existing, established networks (e.g., ethnic media outlets) rather than trying to create new channels. Working through existing networks may better meet partners’ needs and help to ensure overall message sustainability. CFBOs can provide important insight into these established networks. For effective communications, health officials should consider engaging at multiple levels. Low-level engagement uses channels such as traditional advertisements, websites, flyers, and press releases. Medium-level engagement uses a mix of indirect and semidirect communication pathways (e.g., prerecorded, widely distributed phone messages). High-level engagement relies on face-to-face, direct communication.14 Trusted messengers are vital in conveying informationFigure 2. Resources for health GDC-0084 manufacturer communicators on how to work with community and faith-based organizations to prepare for an Ebola response and other public health emergenciesResourceHHS Center for FaithBased and Neighborhood Partnerships website CDC’s Crisis and Emergency Risk Communication ProgramTools offeredContains tool kits and resources to help community organizations work with health departments. Tools are available to assist faith leaders in Mdivi-1 price helping communities address Ebola concerns. (http://www.hhs.gov/partnerships/resources/index.html) Tools that can help health department communicators involve partner organizations, including resources on working with communities and building consensus during a public health crisis. (http://emergency.cdc.gov/cerc/resources/pdf/cerc_2014edition.pdf) A free online course that provides risk communication techniques to j.jebo.2013.04.005 help partners communicate accurate risk information during times of anxiety and fear. (http://emergency.cdc.gov/cerc/training/basic/index.asp)CDC Clear Communication Index CDC ASTHO At-Risk Populations Guidance National Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster website Model Practices to Increase Influenza Prevention Among Hard-to-Reach PopulationsProvides a research-based tool to help users develop and assess public communication materials. (http://www.cdc.gov/ccindex/index.html) Provides a framework and recommendations to assist planning for at-risk populations during pandemics and other public health emergencies. (http://www.astho.org/programs/infectious-disease/at-risk-populations) A nonpartisan, nonprofit, membership-based organization that has resources for organizations wishing to share knowledge and resources in disasters. (www.nvoad.org) A guide developed by ASTHO in collaboration with Emory University’s Interfaith Health Program, designed for public health and religious leaders. It aims to str.Racy. It is best to use plain language for these messages so that community members can easily understand them. Messages should: ?Be simple, clear, and direct; ?Use the fewest words needed to convey jasp.12117 key information; ?Communicate one to three key points at most; ?Be free of jargon and aimed at approximately a sixth-grade reading level (guidelines on simplifying messages can be found in the U.S. government’s Plain Language Action and Information Network Quick Reference Guide12 and the Clear Communication Index);13 ?Be translated in appropriate languages for communities; and?Be framed in positive terms (i.e., focused on what to do as opposed to what not to do). Step 8: use a variety of methods to convey and amplify messages Health department communications and community mobilization teams may find it useful to disseminate health messages through existing, established networks (e.g., ethnic media outlets) rather than trying to create new channels. Working through existing networks may better meet partners’ needs and help to ensure overall message sustainability. CFBOs can provide important insight into these established networks. For effective communications, health officials should consider engaging at multiple levels. Low-level engagement uses channels such as traditional advertisements, websites, flyers, and press releases. Medium-level engagement uses a mix of indirect and semidirect communication pathways (e.g., prerecorded, widely distributed phone messages). High-level engagement relies on face-to-face, direct communication.14 Trusted messengers are vital in conveying informationFigure 2. Resources for health communicators on how to work with community and faith-based organizations to prepare for an Ebola response and other public health emergenciesResourceHHS Center for FaithBased and Neighborhood Partnerships website CDC’s Crisis and Emergency Risk Communication ProgramTools offeredContains tool kits and resources to help community organizations work with health departments. Tools are available to assist faith leaders in helping communities address Ebola concerns. (http://www.hhs.gov/partnerships/resources/index.html) Tools that can help health department communicators involve partner organizations, including resources on working with communities and building consensus during a public health crisis. (http://emergency.cdc.gov/cerc/resources/pdf/cerc_2014edition.pdf) A free online course that provides risk communication techniques to j.jebo.2013.04.005 help partners communicate accurate risk information during times of anxiety and fear. (http://emergency.cdc.gov/cerc/training/basic/index.asp)CDC Clear Communication Index CDC ASTHO At-Risk Populations Guidance National Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster website Model Practices to Increase Influenza Prevention Among Hard-to-Reach PopulationsProvides a research-based tool to help users develop and assess public communication materials. (http://www.cdc.gov/ccindex/index.html) Provides a framework and recommendations to assist planning for at-risk populations during pandemics and other public health emergencies. (http://www.astho.org/programs/infectious-disease/at-risk-populations) A nonpartisan, nonprofit, membership-based organization that has resources for organizations wishing to share knowledge and resources in disasters. (www.nvoad.org) A guide developed by ASTHO in collaboration with Emory University’s Interfaith Health Program, designed for public health and religious leaders. It aims to str.

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