Nd population. Nevertheless, it is also well demonstrated that this particular

Nd population. Nevertheless, it is also well demonstrated that this particular patient group is more likely to terminate treatment prematurely and displays lower rates of treatment compliance than their native counterparts. This reluctance for service utilization might be partially because of the fact that people from non-Western ethnocultural backgrounds (e.g., Turkey) often have a different notion and comprehension of mental VER-52296 supplier health and illness as compared with those of the people from Western societies. Such mismatch often results in discrepancies between the needs and expectations of immigrant patients and clinicians, which attenuate the communication and effectiveness of treatment and lead to unexplained high dropout rates. To provide continued provision of culture-sensitive, high quality, evidence-based mental health care, the advancement of researches exploring such sociocultural differences between the patients’ and the clinicians’ notions of mental health must occur. In response to these problems, the current review aims to explore the interplay between culture and mental processes that associate with the etiology, maintenance, and management of depression among Turkish immigrant patients. This is to inform clinicians regarding culturespecific correlates of depression among Turkish patients to enable them to present interventions that fit the needs and expectations of this particular patient group. Keywords: Culture, psychotherapy immigration, mental health, depression,AN OVERVIEW ON MIGRATION AND MENTAL HEALTH IN EUROPEToday, the demographic profile of Europe’s population is considerably more heterogeneous than it has ever been before. The increased inflow of immigrants has been stated as a key force in this contemporary demographic diversity. Past and recent reports have demonstrated that throughout Western Europe, the number of foreign populations has been rising and is estimated to be 56 million international immigrants. In 2014, the number of people living in the EU-28 who were citizens of non-member countries was 19.6 million, while the number of people living in the EU-28 who had been born outside of the EU was 33.5 million (1). Turkish immigrants form one of the largest immigrant groups in Western Europe reaching a total population of nearly 4 million (2). The largest number of Turkish immigrant workers is found in Germany followed by France, the Netherlands, Austria, Belgium, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, Sweden, Denmark, Italy, and Norway (3). As is well known, adaptation to a new culture, namely acculturation, can present difficulties that immigrants have to cope with. The process of integration into new styles of interpersonal relationships, social rules, organization of community services, etc., may be stressful in its own right because immigrants may feel a threat to their sense of self-efficacy (4). Additionally, reconciling the norms and values of their new and old cultures may be buy BX795 difficult, particularly when these are conflicting (5,6,7). Together with the difficulties that are normally occur during immigration (i.e., loss and bereavement), such adverse psychological effects, known as acculturative stress, put immigrants at increased risk of poor mental health. Accordingly, several studies indicated that the immigration and its related acculturation stress are associated with a higher risk of mental disorders, such as anxiety and depression (8). This might be especially true for immigrants with a Turkish back.Nd population. Nevertheless, it is also well demonstrated that this particular patient group is more likely to terminate treatment prematurely and displays lower rates of treatment compliance than their native counterparts. This reluctance for service utilization might be partially because of the fact that people from non-Western ethnocultural backgrounds (e.g., Turkey) often have a different notion and comprehension of mental health and illness as compared with those of the people from Western societies. Such mismatch often results in discrepancies between the needs and expectations of immigrant patients and clinicians, which attenuate the communication and effectiveness of treatment and lead to unexplained high dropout rates. To provide continued provision of culture-sensitive, high quality, evidence-based mental health care, the advancement of researches exploring such sociocultural differences between the patients’ and the clinicians’ notions of mental health must occur. In response to these problems, the current review aims to explore the interplay between culture and mental processes that associate with the etiology, maintenance, and management of depression among Turkish immigrant patients. This is to inform clinicians regarding culturespecific correlates of depression among Turkish patients to enable them to present interventions that fit the needs and expectations of this particular patient group. Keywords: Culture, psychotherapy immigration, mental health, depression,AN OVERVIEW ON MIGRATION AND MENTAL HEALTH IN EUROPEToday, the demographic profile of Europe’s population is considerably more heterogeneous than it has ever been before. The increased inflow of immigrants has been stated as a key force in this contemporary demographic diversity. Past and recent reports have demonstrated that throughout Western Europe, the number of foreign populations has been rising and is estimated to be 56 million international immigrants. In 2014, the number of people living in the EU-28 who were citizens of non-member countries was 19.6 million, while the number of people living in the EU-28 who had been born outside of the EU was 33.5 million (1). Turkish immigrants form one of the largest immigrant groups in Western Europe reaching a total population of nearly 4 million (2). The largest number of Turkish immigrant workers is found in Germany followed by France, the Netherlands, Austria, Belgium, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, Sweden, Denmark, Italy, and Norway (3). As is well known, adaptation to a new culture, namely acculturation, can present difficulties that immigrants have to cope with. The process of integration into new styles of interpersonal relationships, social rules, organization of community services, etc., may be stressful in its own right because immigrants may feel a threat to their sense of self-efficacy (4). Additionally, reconciling the norms and values of their new and old cultures may be difficult, particularly when these are conflicting (5,6,7). Together with the difficulties that are normally occur during immigration (i.e., loss and bereavement), such adverse psychological effects, known as acculturative stress, put immigrants at increased risk of poor mental health. Accordingly, several studies indicated that the immigration and its related acculturation stress are associated with a higher risk of mental disorders, such as anxiety and depression (8). This might be especially true for immigrants with a Turkish back.

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