Ent was developed using various sources [39-43]. Mobile augmented reality education

Ent was developed using various sources [39-43]. Mobile augmented reality education (MARE). Augmented reality (AR).b cThe Functional Level Design OverviewMARE provides a prompt, portable tool for medical student learning within the clinical setting in order to transform knowledge into practice. The flexible personal paradigm, which is “more inclusive, discriminating, open, reflective, and emotionally able to change,” is more appropriate for guiding action [43]. The most important function of AR is mixing aspects of the real environment with virtual objects to create different learning environments. As backed by the learning theories previously discussed, these mixed environments willhttp://mededu.jmir.org/2015/2/e10/be useful for the medical student to form a flexible personal paradigm. We propose the following function structure shown in Figure 3 for developing MARE. The personal paradigm is the starting point of design learning and must transform to become flexible. A physician’s personal paradigm includes his or her personal style of diagnosis, treatment, prescription, and drugs (P-diagnosis, P-treatment, P-prescription and P-drugs, which are four related processes) [13]. The physician’s personal paradigm could be analyzed through observation and deep interviews.XSL?FORenderXJMIR Medical Education 2015 | vol. 1 | iss. 2 | e10 | p.8 (page number not for citation purposes)JMIR MEDICAL EDUCATION Second, by comparing the learners’ personal NVP-QAW039 web paradigms with professional expectations, we can describe the learning objectives and check their problematic reference. The learning activities cycle, which focuses on improving one’s personal paradigm from feeling, watching, and thinking to doing, will help learners reflect on their practice and change the problematic frames of reference. After identifying the learning objectives, an AR environment of MARE framework should be designed. Four oriented learning environments, which can add different virtual objects to the real clinical environment, create multiple sensory channels for learning [45]. Affective-oriented environments affect health care learners’ feelings. Perception-oriented environments are beneficial for observation. Symbol-oriented environments are particularly useful for thinking, and behavior-oriented environments are beneficial for doing [42]. The real clinical environments are the immediate context in which a connection is needed between learning and practice. The real clinical environment is the anchor and scaffold upon which learners are encouraged to learn. The real clinical environment includes physical environments and social environments. The content in physical environments, such as patients and their disease, microbiological samples, documentation and clinical notes, medical equipment, drugs,Figure 3. MARE function structure.Zhu et al and consequences of bacterial resistance, can be the anchor to trigger a learning activity, which then aims to fulfill a learning outcome within the appropriate therapeutic stage. The social environment (ie, local culture and customs, AZD0865 web organizational norms, and policy) shapes the content and forms of learning, which should be more instrumental or communicative. Virtual environments, which are simulated with computers, extend the real-world environment with an assurance of safety and enable or increase opportunities for engagement. Although it may be necessary or attractive for medical learners to learn in the clinical context, observing a real-wo.Ent was developed using various sources [39-43]. Mobile augmented reality education (MARE). Augmented reality (AR).b cThe Functional Level Design OverviewMARE provides a prompt, portable tool for medical student learning within the clinical setting in order to transform knowledge into practice. The flexible personal paradigm, which is “more inclusive, discriminating, open, reflective, and emotionally able to change,” is more appropriate for guiding action [43]. The most important function of AR is mixing aspects of the real environment with virtual objects to create different learning environments. As backed by the learning theories previously discussed, these mixed environments willhttp://mededu.jmir.org/2015/2/e10/be useful for the medical student to form a flexible personal paradigm. We propose the following function structure shown in Figure 3 for developing MARE. The personal paradigm is the starting point of design learning and must transform to become flexible. A physician’s personal paradigm includes his or her personal style of diagnosis, treatment, prescription, and drugs (P-diagnosis, P-treatment, P-prescription and P-drugs, which are four related processes) [13]. The physician’s personal paradigm could be analyzed through observation and deep interviews.XSL?FORenderXJMIR Medical Education 2015 | vol. 1 | iss. 2 | e10 | p.8 (page number not for citation purposes)JMIR MEDICAL EDUCATION Second, by comparing the learners’ personal paradigms with professional expectations, we can describe the learning objectives and check their problematic reference. The learning activities cycle, which focuses on improving one’s personal paradigm from feeling, watching, and thinking to doing, will help learners reflect on their practice and change the problematic frames of reference. After identifying the learning objectives, an AR environment of MARE framework should be designed. Four oriented learning environments, which can add different virtual objects to the real clinical environment, create multiple sensory channels for learning [45]. Affective-oriented environments affect health care learners’ feelings. Perception-oriented environments are beneficial for observation. Symbol-oriented environments are particularly useful for thinking, and behavior-oriented environments are beneficial for doing [42]. The real clinical environments are the immediate context in which a connection is needed between learning and practice. The real clinical environment is the anchor and scaffold upon which learners are encouraged to learn. The real clinical environment includes physical environments and social environments. The content in physical environments, such as patients and their disease, microbiological samples, documentation and clinical notes, medical equipment, drugs,Figure 3. MARE function structure.Zhu et al and consequences of bacterial resistance, can be the anchor to trigger a learning activity, which then aims to fulfill a learning outcome within the appropriate therapeutic stage. The social environment (ie, local culture and customs, organizational norms, and policy) shapes the content and forms of learning, which should be more instrumental or communicative. Virtual environments, which are simulated with computers, extend the real-world environment with an assurance of safety and enable or increase opportunities for engagement. Although it may be necessary or attractive for medical learners to learn in the clinical context, observing a real-wo.

Leave a Reply