N churches. In the present analysis, there was one significant effect

N churches. In the present analysis, there was one significant effect in which income was positively related to church membership indicating that higher income respondents were more likely to be church members. This Luteolin 7-glucoside chemical information finding likely reflects two related issues. First, if we assume that people of higher incomes attend churches with comparable average incomes (i.e., income homogeneity), it may be the case that higher vs. lower income congregations place a greater emphasis on being an official church member. Second, higher income respondents may be more inclined to establish accurate documentation of church contributions (i.e., documentation of membership dues, yearly tithing and other contributions to church funds and obligations) for income tax purposes. As a consequence, maintaining official membership may be of greater importance to higher income persons. Many churches provide official members with a yearly statement of contributions for income tax purposes. This documentation is more important for higher income respondents who are more likely to claim deductions for charitable contributions. Education was significant in 2 of the 10 regression equations, both of which involved measures of subjective religiosity. Respondents with fewer years of formal education were more likely than their higher educated counterparts to indicate higher levels of self-rated religiosity, and indicate that religion was of greater importance in their daily life. In contrast, prior research on African Americans indicated that those with higher education were more likely to attend services and be official church members (Chatters et al., 1999; Taylor, 1988). Collectively, these findings demonstrate that while there are no education differences in organizational and non-organizational activities, Caribbean Blacks with lower levels of education report that religion is more central to their lives. Denomination differences were evident in all 10 of the regression models. As might be anticipated, the majority of the differences were between those who did not have a current religious denomination and Baptists (the excluded category); those without a stated religious affiliation reported lower levels of religiosity (7 regressions). One notable non-significant finding is that those without a religious denomination prayed as frequently as Baptists. Catholics were less likely to be official members of their churches, engaged in other church activities and read religious materials less frequently than Baptists. Episcopalians get T0901317 alsoNIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author ManuscriptRev Relig Res. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2011 December 1.Taylor et al.Pageengaged in other activities at their place of worship less frequently than did Baptists. In addition, however, several comparisons indicated that other denominations had higher levels of religious involvement than did Baptists. Pentecostals indicated that they attended religious services, read religious materials and prayed more frequently, and also expressed higher levels of subjective religiosity (i.e., importance of religion in home when growing up, importance of religion in life, self-rated religiosity). Similarly, in comparison to Baptists, Seven Day Adventists attended religious services more frequently and asked someone to pray for them on a more frequent basis. Collectively, these findings underscore pervasive denominational patterns of religious involvement and are consistent with re.N churches. In the present analysis, there was one significant effect in which income was positively related to church membership indicating that higher income respondents were more likely to be church members. This finding likely reflects two related issues. First, if we assume that people of higher incomes attend churches with comparable average incomes (i.e., income homogeneity), it may be the case that higher vs. lower income congregations place a greater emphasis on being an official church member. Second, higher income respondents may be more inclined to establish accurate documentation of church contributions (i.e., documentation of membership dues, yearly tithing and other contributions to church funds and obligations) for income tax purposes. As a consequence, maintaining official membership may be of greater importance to higher income persons. Many churches provide official members with a yearly statement of contributions for income tax purposes. This documentation is more important for higher income respondents who are more likely to claim deductions for charitable contributions. Education was significant in 2 of the 10 regression equations, both of which involved measures of subjective religiosity. Respondents with fewer years of formal education were more likely than their higher educated counterparts to indicate higher levels of self-rated religiosity, and indicate that religion was of greater importance in their daily life. In contrast, prior research on African Americans indicated that those with higher education were more likely to attend services and be official church members (Chatters et al., 1999; Taylor, 1988). Collectively, these findings demonstrate that while there are no education differences in organizational and non-organizational activities, Caribbean Blacks with lower levels of education report that religion is more central to their lives. Denomination differences were evident in all 10 of the regression models. As might be anticipated, the majority of the differences were between those who did not have a current religious denomination and Baptists (the excluded category); those without a stated religious affiliation reported lower levels of religiosity (7 regressions). One notable non-significant finding is that those without a religious denomination prayed as frequently as Baptists. Catholics were less likely to be official members of their churches, engaged in other church activities and read religious materials less frequently than Baptists. Episcopalians alsoNIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author ManuscriptRev Relig Res. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2011 December 1.Taylor et al.Pageengaged in other activities at their place of worship less frequently than did Baptists. In addition, however, several comparisons indicated that other denominations had higher levels of religious involvement than did Baptists. Pentecostals indicated that they attended religious services, read religious materials and prayed more frequently, and also expressed higher levels of subjective religiosity (i.e., importance of religion in home when growing up, importance of religion in life, self-rated religiosity). Similarly, in comparison to Baptists, Seven Day Adventists attended religious services more frequently and asked someone to pray for them on a more frequent basis. Collectively, these findings underscore pervasive denominational patterns of religious involvement and are consistent with re.

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